Submarine escape and rescue is a community Analox have been a part of since 1997. Analox has gained extensive experience in designing and manufacturing submarine atmosphere monitoring systems.

By combining our knowledge of gas sensing techniques with our understanding of the submarine environment, diving and hyperbaric systems, we are able to offer a full range of atmosphere monitoring systems for; routine submarine atmosphere monitoring, submarine escape and rescue and deployment of special forces from submarines and submersibles.

A submarine is a sealed environment in which the crew live and work for up to 90 days. The atmosphere must be carefully managed – not only to ensure the boat is capable of supporting life while submerged, but also to limit exposure to potentially harmful substances.

We understand the complexities of environmental pressuretemperature and humidity variations and are committed to using our expertise to remain the first choice for gas monitoring for the world’s submarine nations.

Using our unique pressure-correction technology we can ensure that our gas analysers provide accurate readings for the essential life gases in the dynamic submarine environment.

Check out our COSAMS Atmosphere Analyzer.

Our technical expertise can specify and design to IEC61508 cost-effective safety critical systems up to Sil 3.  Proven in service; TMCC, NSRS, DMS.

These adaptable technologies find applications not only in escape and rescue but also in systems which are used for special operations diver deployment and routine monitoring of the submarine atmosphere.

We are committed to using our expertise to become the first choice for atmosphere monitoring for the world’s submarine nations.

Our submarine gas detection solutions include:

  • Central atmosphere monitoring – designed for sampling up to 30 gases from various locations around the boat
  • Distributed sensor network – a centrally located PLC user interface linked to discrete gas sensors or sensor modules located around the boat
  • Carbon monoxide monitoring – CO sensors aimed at routine monitoring of the submarine atmosphere, in line with threshold values for different operating nations
  • Portable analysers – ideal for confined space entry or as use as an emergency back-up to the primary atmosphere monitoring system.

We work with a number of international clients, including the Royal NavyRoyal Norwegian NavyRoyal Netherlands Navy and US Navy.

Don’t put the lives of yourself and your crew at unnecessary risk by using industrial sensors that often provide false readings as they are not designed to cope with the stresses and pressures of the deep seas.

Analox sensors are temperature and pressure compensated meaning that the crew can safely manage their own atmospheres with ease while down at depth.

 

A couple of little zingers that we like…

  • In a nuclear submarine, as the reactor’s heat generates the steam to power the submarine, it is referred to as the ‘kettle’
  • A submarine at the sea’s surface is said to be ‘on the roof’

If you have a specific requirement that we have not already addressed, please contact us, as we also offer complete, customized submarine systems.

Multi Gas Solutions

For over 20 years Analox has worked with the submarine community on sub escape and rescue and submarine atmosphere monitors. We are proud of our range of multi-gas monitors which have been developed with a cradle to grave philosophy.

AA Atmosphere Analyzer

AA ATMOSPHERE ANALYZER

A fixed monitor capable of measuring up to 30 gases using SIL oxygen (O2), mass spectrometer and FTIR spectrometer gas sensing modules.

DAMS - Gas Monitoring Aft

DAMS

A fixed Distributed Atmosphere, capable of monitoring gas levels via a modular system architecture.

Sub-MkIIIF

SUB MKIIIF

A fixed hyperbaric or hypobaric atmosphere monitor, detecting carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), pressure, temperature and humidity.

Sub Mk3P

Sub Mk3P

The new portable DISSUB monitor continuously monitors partial pressure O2 & CO2 plus pressure and temperature in the escape compartment, you are now able to maintain the unit in the dockyard too.

SUB ASPIDA

SUB ASPIDA

A compact portable analyzer used as a backup monitor on board submarines and at altitude. The unit can simultaneously sense both oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2), whilst providing pressure corrected readings for both.

Carbon Monoxide Solutions

Carbon monoxide (CO) is difficult to detect using standard industrial sensors due to the cross-sensitivity to hydrogen (H). Analox provides solutions specific for the submarine market.

COSAMS

COSAMS

A fixed continuous real-time monitor of carbon monoxide (CO).

Oxygen Solutions

Oxygen (O2) is a critical gas but too much oxygen (O2) can cause potential fire hazards and too little can cause breathing difficulties. Analox offers various oxygen (O2) analyzers to assist you in ensuring your submariners are safe in their post.

SUB ASPIDA

SUB ASPIDA

A compact portable analyzer used as a backup monitor on board submarines and at altitude. The unit can simultaneously sense both oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2), whilst providing pressure corrected readings for both.

Carbon Dioxide Solutions

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is toxic, add in the complexity of a submarine environment and it becomes life-critical. Analox offers a range of analyzers suitable to warn on rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels.

SUB ASPIDA

SUB ASPIDA

A compact portable analyzer used as a backup monitor on board submarines and at altitude. The unit can simultaneously sense both oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2), whilst providing pressure corrected readings for both.

Obsolete Products

Products in this section are now obsolete. Click on the unit/s to find the replacement:

SUB MKIIP

SUB MKIIP

A portable DISSUB monitor ensuring you meet NATO STANAG 1476:2014 (ANEP/MNEP-86). Offering oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO2), temperature, depth and time readings in a robust case.

Fun Fact

The first military submarine was Turtle in 1776. During the American Revolutionary War, Turtle tried and failed to sink a British warship, HMS Eagle in New York harbor on September 7, 1776.

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